‘The rules are in my head.’

Revisit System’s interview with Rei Kawakubo ahead of The Met’s 2017 retrospective.

It’s official. The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York have announced that Rei Kawakubo is to be the subject of its next retrospective. This will be their first dedicated to a living designer since Yves Saint Laurent in 1983.

Read Hans Ulrich Obrist’s interview with Kawakubo for System No. 2 here.

11/11/16

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Face à face

Merry England

By Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier of Hillier Bartley

Face à face – Merry England by Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier of Hillier Bartley

Face à face – Merry England by Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier of Hillier Bartley

‘Balance. The mix, the contrast, the extremes,
The peace and the rebellion:
Merry England.’

Katie Hillier, Luella Bartley
Hillier Bartley

09/11/16

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Face à face

Couture Future

By Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant, of Courrèges

Face à face – Couture Future by Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant of Courrèges

André Courrèges had one vision: to redefine Parisian couture.
Luxury formed the foundation of his brand of futurism.

Face à face – Couture Future by Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant of Courrèges

The unbroken lines, the dropped shoulder still permeate visions of what lies ahead.
Our view of the future is still one embedded in Courrèges’ past.

02/11/16

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‘In today’s fashion, sex doesn’t sell. Ennui does.’

Why a vacant stare is the look du jour.

Photographed by Zoe Ghertner, styled by Marie Chaix, with text by Alexander Fury.

‘Like the fantasies depicted in Renaissance art, models clutch handbags of exorbitant price, dressed in furs, coldly glaring at us from their finery.’

Alexander Fury on the power of passivity in fashion throughout history.

Read the full feature in System No. 8 – Click to buy

31/10/16

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‘It was
like space
exploration
in a fashion
magazine.’

When art director Ruth Ansel took Harper’s Bazaar into the unknown.

Interview by Jonathan Wingfield.

Harper’s Bazaar, April 1965
‘The Galactic Beauty to the Rescue’: Jean Shrimpton
Photograph by Richard Avedon

Harper’s Bazaar, April 1965
Bob Dylan; ‘Memoir of an Aged Child’ by Alfred Duhrssen
Photograph by Richard Avedon

Harper’s Bazaar, September 1965
‘This Woman Is You’
Collage by Katerina Denzinger from photographs by Richard Avedon

Harper’s Bazaar, December 1967
‘For the Civilized Man’
Image by James Rosenquist

Read the full feature in System No. 8 – Click to buy.

28/10/16

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‘The shoes do the talking.’

Stepping out with Fabrizio Viti, the discreet but daring shoe designer behind everyone (like Gucci, Prada, Helmut Lang, Louis Vuitton…).

Interview by Pamela Golbin, images by Thomas Lohr and Thibault Montamat.

Fabrizio Viti has worked and learned, and been an inspiration behind the scenes at the biggest French and Italian houses, creating shoes for the likes of Tom Ford, Miuccia Prada, Helmut Lang, and while at Louis Vuitton, Nicolas Ghesquière and Marc Jacobs.

For System No. 8, he invited us to discuss his new side project: designing – for the first time – under his own name. Below is just one of the many anecdotes he has from years spent working with other labels before launching his own.

‘Back in 1998, when I was called by Gucci, I was so excited to be in the same room as Tom Ford and Carine Roitfeld, who was always wearing a black pencil skirt and stiletto heels. The first show I worked on with Tom Ford was Spring/Summer 1999, what we called the Hippie collection. It was super successful and also my first experience of a major show. After all the years spent in factories, Gucci was my first step into the glamorous world of fashion.

Gucci was known for very aggressive high heels, but that season, Tom wanted to do something different. So the heel was very, very small, round and embroidered. It had a very Indian feeling. You know, that fabric with little mirrors? He was looking for that effect. We were already set up in the Corso Venezia showroom in Milan, which meant the show was five days away. The problem was that we couldn’t find the fabric. I had an idea and asked Tom to lend me his driver. It was pouring with rain and I went to all of the Indian restaurants in the Porta Venezia area of Milan. It took me a while, but I finally found the fabric. It was covering the wall of a restaurant. I calculated the measurements and said, ‘Yeah, we can do one pair of boots’. But the owner couldn’t understand what I wanted. I tried to explain to him that if he took the fabric from the wall, I would pay him for it! All the while I was calling the people at Gucci asking, ‘How much can I pay?’ And they were like, ‘Whatever! Just get it!’ Finally, he agreed to sell, took it down and dusted it. I rushed back. It was all multicoloured with little mirrors. Two days later, it came back from the factory as these beautiful boots.

During the fitting a few days later, Tom comes to me with the boots and says, ‘Fabrizio, can we dye them black?’ And that was the beginning of ‘Fabrizio, can we…?’ Since then ‘Fabrizio, can we…?’ has become like a leitmotif. I was like, ‘Sure’. I took a brush and the paint and a day later they were black. It was the beginning of a certain kind of attitude, which I keep today, where everything is possible. If you cannot find it there, you will find it somewhere else.’

More, from Viti’s time working with Miuccia Prada and Louis Vuitton, in System No. 8 – Click to buy

27/10/16

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The New Normal

Giorgio Armani and System celebrate The New Normal

Amanda Murphy
I am an equestrian, radiology tech, a Model, and I run a ranch.

Astrid Muñoz
I am #photographer. I am classic with a twist. I am a compassionate woman. I am a polo wife.
I am a World Land Trust supporter.

Elisa Sednaoui
I am a social entrepreneur, a wife and mother, a friend and a family member.
I am the founder and executive director of the Elisa Sednaoui Foundation. I am a supporter of the UN Refugee Agency.

Elizabeth von Guttman and Alexia Niedzielski
We are System magazine. We are Ever Conscious. We are Ping and Pong.
We are The Happy Couple.

Hikari Yokoyama
I am a creator. I am free-form. I am an activist with Women for Women International.
I am art obsessed. I am first on the dancefloor.

Liu Wen
I am a dreamer.

Liya Kebede
I am a mother.

Mimi Xu and Rosey Chan
We are a musical duo creating unusual visual and sonic experiences, and like to take our audience on a magical tour.
We are musicians, composers, performers, and food lovers.

Miroslava Duma
I am a mother. I am a wife. I am entrepreneur.
I am a co-founder of The Tot and Buro 24/7. I am a fashion fan.

Marie-Louise Scio
I am a creative. I am Pellicano Hotels. I am a hotel consultant.
I am a mother. I am a traveller.

Quentin Jones
I am a woman with a man's name. I am a director. I am an artist.
I am a peanut butter enthusiast. I am Grey's mama.

Sabine Getty
I am Hillary. I am a procrastinator. I am excessive.
I am a good laugh

Tatiana Casiraghi
I am co-founder of Muzungu Sisters. I am a traveller. I am a supporter of artisans and ancient traditions.
I am a mother.

Zhang Zilin
I am a super mother.

Giorgio Armani and System celebrate The New Normal: a campaign and collection that is a tribute to the contemporary woman.

It is about women whose style transcends the trends of any decade, and an authentic sense of self. Here, System highlights the industry’s leading female creatives, and their myriad roles.

#IAm… What are you?
#GANewNormal

@Armani @SystemMagazine

26/10/16

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‘It’s just normal life, but I find it beautiful.’

The autobiographical themes and inspirations behind a decade of Christopher Kane.

Interview by Jo-Ann Furniss, photographs by Alasdair McLellan.

Ahead of unveiling his Spring/ Summer 2017 collection in London last month, Christopher Kane and his sister Tammy met with Jo-Ann Furniss in their hometown of Motherwell, Scotland. Accompanying them was photographer, Alasdair McLellan. The result of their encounter was a portfolio of personal photographs and references that have inspired Kane over the years, and an interview exploring the man behind ten years of Christopher Kane collections. Below, you’ll find an extract.

Christopher Kane: A big part of the latest collection started with watching a programme about a lost tribe coming into contact with the modern world. They were stealing clothes and saying, ‘Now we have clothes, we are ashamed to be naked’. We wanted that nakedness in the collection, something sexual as well as religious, something almost pagan and pre-Christian, as well as Roman Catholic.

Jo-Ann Furniss: In a way, I think you see yourselves like that tribe…

Christopher Kane: I really treasure clothes, I really do. There is something so special about them and what they meant to us when we were growing up – things like Versace. Clothes certainly changed our lives.

Tammy Kane: It was almost like these clothes are not meant to be for you – but we were going to make them ours anyway. I still feel like I don’t really belong in fashion – and that’s a good thing. We can dip in and out of it all because of that feeling.

Christopher Kane: Fashion people can be some of the worst people, but also some of the best people ever!

Read more in System No. 8 – Click to buy

25/10/16

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‘It’s about being masculine and feminine at the same time.’

Charlotte Casiraghi mans up in this season’s Gucci.

Photographs by Collier Schorr, styling by R. R.